Native ECMAScript modules: the new features and differences from Webpack modules

In the previous article Native ECMAScript modules - the first overview I described the history of the JavaScript modules and the current situation with the native ECMAScript modules implementation:

For now, we have 2 available implementations, which we tried and compared to the bundled module.

The main takeaways, so far, are:

  1. To execute a script or load an external file and execute it as a module use <script type="module">
  2. .js extension cannot be omitted in the import (the exact URL should be provided)
  3. the modules’ scope is not global and this doesn’t refer to anything
  4. native modules are in the strict mode by default (not needed to provide 'use strict' anymore)
  5. module scripts are deferred by default (like <script type="text/javascript" defer />)

In this article, we are going to understand other differences with the bundled modules, abilities to interact with the module scripts, how to rewrite Webpack modules to native ES ones and other tips and tricks.

...

Native ECMAScript modules - the first overview

The 2016 year was incredible in terms of the browser and Node.js applying the ECMAScript 2015 specification. Now we are facing the situation when the support amongst them is close to 100%:

But the standard actually introduced also ECMAScript modules (today also often named ES or ES6 modules). It’s the only part which took (and still taking) the most time to implement as only some have shipped it in the stable version, but all have the implementation available.

To understand better how we come to this point let’s start from the JS modules history and then take a look at the current Native ES modules features and implementations.

...

Node.js debugging with Chrome DevTools (in parallel with browser JavaScript)

Recently Paul Irish described how you can debug Node.js applications with Chrome DevTools.

Since that time Chrome DevTools have evolved and the step, where you had to open the separate page with a specific URL to debug the Node.js code, was removed.

It means, today you can debug your browser JavaScript files and Node.js ones in the same DevTools window in parallel, which makes the perfect sense.

Let’s take a look how it works.

...